Christmas Cards

christmas-card

We made a big decision this year.

For the first time in our marriage, Mrs. Greenbean and I are not sending out Christmas cards. It was a hard choice, because over the years we’ve had a lot of fun doing it. In the early years we sent out boxed ones with hand written messages. As the list grew, we went to photograph infused cards. Then, sometime around 2000ish we embarked on my favorite era–personally created cards. These cards included story, artwork, jokes and all kinds of things that each of the four Greenbeans contributed.

Around 2009 we went back to the picture cards.

Our list grew over the whole 50 states, and it was costing us several hundred dollars to make the cards and then mail them, not to mention the effort.

And all the while, we were receiving an ever-smaller number of Christmas cards. People stopped mailing them. Most of the cards we receive now are from businesses who ‘appreciate’ us.

Christmas cards were invented to stay in contact with people whom you don’t have contact with–people you wouldn’t see on Christmas but wished you could. The prevalence of social media, particularly the ubiquitous Facebook, allows us to communicate that to people far easier, cheaper, and more personally than a Christmas card.

Therefore, we made a digital card just like previous years, but are putting it on the various social medias. The card has photos of us on vacation in Destin, Florida, me and the girls at Dairy Queen, the idiot dog, Phoebe getting her driver’s permit, and Belle in her East Texas Baptist University marching band uniform. We wish you and yours the happiest and merriest of Christmases, a prosperous and meaningful New Year, and most of all spiritual fulfillment as you seek the Lord.

Merry Christmas!

 

PIZZERIA FAKE NEWS STORY FREE ASSOCIATION EXERCISE

yeah, i’m looking at you NPRThe story sounds like a drug-inspired paranoia trip. But here it goes.

Some conspiracy whack jobs on the interwebs told everyone that a pizza shop in Washington D.C. was a front for child-sex trafficking and satanic illuminati shenanigans. The conspiracy loons said Hillary Clinton was involved. Their mindless bilge was all propagated as news, when in fact it was fake-news. Fake-news seems to be more profitable than real news.

People believed these lies unconditionally and didn’t bother to check the facts or consider the source.

Death threats were made. Innocent people were harassed. Someone went into the pizzeria and shot off a couple of rounds from an assault rifle. He said he was investigating the claims about Clinton.

I told you it sounded crazy, didn’t I?

In my novel The Little Girl Waits (which you should buy right now) I have a scene where the traffickers are using an auto repair shop as a front for their evil, and the good guys go in to investigate. It is one of the better scenes in the book, IMHO. But that is fiction. This loon took a real rifle into a real pizza restaurant. A PIZZA RESTAURANT! That is not fiction.

So, the next time someone tells me that the elements in my novel aren’t “believable” I’m just gonna point to this.

I’ve come to think that believability in a story is slightly overrated. (By the way, have you bought my novel The Little Girl Waits yet? Go Ahead and get the follow-up to it, How Great is The Darkness while you’re at it.) When I pick up a novel to read, I don’t want it to look exactly like my everyday world. I want it to be different. I want the unexpected. I want to see believable characters in unbelievable situations. In fact, I like that sentence so much, I’m gonna set it off in its own quote bracket to highlight the point like they do in fancy publications.

I want to see believable characters in unbelievable situations

This gets back to another thing I believe in so deeply. Character trumps plot. We love characters. We tolerate plots. The plot only exists to reveal the integrity and grit (or lack thereof) of the character(s). I’ll use Harry Potter because it is so easy. The plot of what is going on and the whose it, spell it, when it, is very inconsequential. We care about Harry, his friends, Dumbledore, and the showdown with Voldemort. The characters are the plot.

Of course, the plot matters. I don’t mean to say it doesn’t have a role to play in the development of a good story. What I am saying is that character development matters far more, and it is the characters that keep the reader engaged. The moment the reader stops caring about the character he or she is likely to put the book down and go turn the television on  and watch the Gilmore Girls–because that is all character.

But back to the pizza shop. It is actually a place called Comet Ping Pong Pizza. Disclosure–I’ve never been there, so the pizza might be lousy.

I think they should lawyer-up and start the lawsuits. If I owned that business, I would sue everyone I could find that pushed that fake news story. I’m not generally litigation happy, but for crying-out-loud there needs to be some accountability here. Free speech is important, but I can’t shout, “Fire” in a movie theater and fake news propagators must be held accountable.

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This is not a real news story

 

There are two problems at play here, as I see it. The first problem is, as this (click here) article on slate points out, conspiracies to hurt children exist. One only has to think of Jerry Sandusky at Penn State or the Catholic Diocese of Boston highlighted in the film Spotlight. It is sickening to think about, but true. The second problem, though, is different. It is the problem that we attribute the worst possible societal crime to our political opponents. It is not enough to suspect a child-sex ring, but somehow it must be Hillary Clinton’s fault. Before the progresses get all high and mighty about this, they need to realize they are equally to blame when they all but accuse Donald Trump of having white hoods in his closet.

This is all problematic. But you know what else is problematic–who we blame. If  I hear one more person blame “the internet” or “social media” for this (yeah, I’m looking at you NPR), I’m gonna do something serious like eat an apple without washing it first. Dont’ try me!

This is not the internet’s fault. The internet is neutral, like a car. You can drive it wherever you want. The internet takes you places and grants you conversation. The problem is not the medium. The problem is that people have lost the ability to think critically. I don’t when it happened, somewhere since my childhood the important skill of analysis has vaporized.

Fake news stories have been here, since, like, forever! The National Enquirer was based on it in my childhood. People read it, but they knew it was garbage.

Somehow we’ve lot the ability to chuckle at the stupidity and move on.

The reason is we want to believe the garbage.

It reminds me a bit of my theology of zombies. You read that right. Zombies have a theology. The short of it is that the zombie genre and our fascination with it hints at a deep down feeling of unease that we have with our life. We have a sense that something is out of balance, something is not quite right in the world, and we are just one bad moment from ending the whole thing. This thinking has crept into our political world. We expect there to be a political apocalypse any day now, when our darkest nightmares are confirmed. It is fatalism that flows from a lack of spirituality. To read more about the theology of zombies, click here.

Therefore, the political enemy must, necessarily, be completely evil. He or she can’t just be wrong on the issue or the policy, he must be completely evil. So George Bush was compared with Hitler, Obama was a secret Muslim, Trump is a Nazi, Clinton is the Illuminati, and on and on and on. This kind of though pollutes our national discourse.

One more thought. Chew on this for a bit. A pastor friend of mine shared this week that someone he knew refused to pray for peace because he believed that the world needed to get worse and worse so that Jesus would come back.

That is how you end up with assault rifles at pizza joints where people are looking for presidential candidates sacrificing children.

 

 

 

GREENBEAN’S 2011 FAVES #4: FACEBOOK

So Greenbean continues the new year by re-posting his top five favorites from 2011.  I think technically this is a post from 2010, but it has gotten hits in 2011 so I carried it over.  I also carried it over because I think it is needed, once again.  My perception is that a great deal of evil occurs on Facebook as people take shots at each other and involve others in escalating conflict.  This is not good.  FB should be fun and enjoyable and help our relationships, not hinder them or be painful.   

FACEBOOK RULES I NEED TO REMEMBER

I have been on Facebook slightly longer than most.  I started out on Myspace and then for a while I managed two accounts.  Eventually, though, I dropped Myspace because it was not nearly as user friendly as Facebook and the spammed solicitations were awful.  FB (Facebook) has so many advantages to people like me—who want to connect with folk and communicate instantly—that it would be stupid not to utilize it as a ministry tool and in my own personal life.

What I have found though, is that as more and more people FB they have substituted FB posts for all communication.  This has led to some very nasty trends.  Christian people on FB have somehow gotten the notion that they can post all types of mean things about people—usually passive aggressive—with no consequences.  But, there are consequences because there are only about 500 million people out there!  If you rant to your dumb dog about the stupid thing your friend did, the dumb dog will not tell your friend or a mutual friend.  But if you post it as your status on FB, don’t be surprised if all your friends read it and then start posting wars; all taking swipes at each other.

Emerging technologies call for emerging wisdom.  I’ve devised 6 rules for the Christian Facebooker.  Please note, all of them I have personally broken in the past!  Experience is the best teacher.

FB Rule #1—Never post anything with dirty words or immoral innuendo.  Many FB users are children and the influence we have over them should be positive, not negative.

FB Rule #2—If your post is about someone specific, it should be complimentary and not mean.  What we learned from our parents is true of FB—“If you can’t post something nice, don’t post anything at all.”

FB Rule #3—Never air dirty laundry on FB.  NEVER.  Jesus tells us in Matthew 18 that we should go to the individual personally to discuss things that are between us.  If FB is your means then message them and talk it out.  Do not use the “comment” line to take a shot at a deacon or something like that.  That is the OPPOSITE of Jesus’ command.

FB Rule #4—Be careful of the “friends” motif.  A FB friend is not necessarily a friend who has your best interests at heart.  Likewise, on FB you can remove a friend by simply hitting “delete.”  But in the real world it is not that clean.  Friendship is messy.  It is impossible to terminate a relationship just by “deleting” someone.

FB Rule #5—Clarify posts.  Sometimes I post serious stuff and sometimes I post silly stuff.  This has caused some people to be confused.  Go back and clarify—so that people understand your intent.  That is the problem with printed words; it is hard to know the emotion behind them.

FB Rule #6—If you are angry, don’t post anything.  EVER.  Just read others and hit the like buttons and such.  FBing while angry only leads to problems.

Have fun on FB, but also remember other people are watching us (that is what FB is, by definition) and our Christian witness is always under scrutiny.

FACEBOOK RULES I NEED TO REMEMBER

I have been on Facebook slightly longer than most.  I started out on Myspace and then for a while I managed two accounts.  Eventually, though, I dropped Myspace because it was not nearly as user friendly as Facebook and the spammed solicitations were awful.  FB (Facebook) has so many advantages to people like me—who want to connect with folk and communicate instantly—that it would be stupid not to utilize it as a ministry tool and in my own personal life. 

What I have found though, is that as more and more people FB they have substituted FB posts for all communication.  This has led to some very nasty trends.  Christian people on FB have somehow gotten the notion that they can post all types of mean things about people—usually passive aggressive—with no consequences.  But, there are consequences because there are only about 500 million people out there!  If you rant to your dumb dog about the stupid thing your friend did, the dumb dog will not tell your friend or a mutual friend.  But if you post it as your post on FB, don’t be surprised if all your friends read it and then start posting wars; all taking swipes at each other. 

Emerging technologies call for emerging wisdom.  I’ve devised 6 rules for the Christian Facebooker.  Please note, all of them I have personally broken in the past!  Experience is the best teacher.

            FB Rule #1—Never post anything with dirty words or immoral innuendo.  Many FB users are children and the influence we have over them should be positive, not negative.

            FB Rule #2—If your post is about someone specific, it should be complimentary and not mean.  What we learned from our parents is true of FB—“If you can’t post something nice, don’t post anything at all.”

            FB Rule #3—Never air dirty laundry on FB.  NEVER.  Jesus tells us in Matthew 18 that we should go to the individually personally to discuss things that are between us.  If FB is your means then message them and talk it out.  Do not use the “comment” line to take shot at a deacon or something like that.  That is the OPPOSITE of Jesus’ command.

            FB Rule #4—Be careful of the “friends” motif.  A FB friend is not necessarily a friend who has your best interests at heart.  Likewise, on FB you can remove a friend by simply hitting “delete.”  But in the real world it is not that clean.  Friendship is messy.  It is impossible to terminate a relationship just by “deleting” someone.

            FB Rule #5—Clarify posts.  Sometimes I post serious stuff and sometimes I post silly stuff.  This has caused some people to be confused.  Go back and clarify—so that people understand your intent.  That is the problem with printed words; it is hard to know the emotion behind them.

            FB Rule #6—If you are angry, don’t post anything.  EVER.  Just read others and hit the like buttons and such.  FBing while angry only leads to problems.

Have fun on FB, but also remember other people are watching us (that is what FB is, by definition) and our Christian witness is always under scrutiny.