WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT BISCUITS

As you know, biscuits are serious.  I’ve detailed before the foundational recipe for buttermilk biscuits.  However, as a biscuit artist, I am always experimenting.  Recently I made the most delicious biscuits I’ve ever–EVER–eaten.

Start with the basics.

  • Preheat over to 425°.
  • Put self-rising flour in a bowl.  The amount will vary based on the number of biscuits you want, but maybe start with three cups.
  • Add 2 teaspoons of baking powder
  • Add Crisco shortening with your hands until it starts to bead.

Now, liven it up.

  • Add a half a stick of butter.
  • Add a half of a cup of Miracle Whip.  Mayo would work too, but I prefer Miracle Whip.

    Secret Ingredient
    Secret Ingredient
  • Mix the dough well, then add the buttermilk in small doses until the dough forms one large ball and is sticky.
  • Sprinkle a little regular flour down on the counter top (or a roll pad) and then turn the dough over a couple of times until it is no longer sticky.
  • Cut into biscuits using an empty, clean, tuna can.

Now, let’s change up my usual a little bit more.

  • Dab buttermilk on top of the biscuits.
  • If you have time, let the uncooked biscuits sit for an hour.
  • Grease a cast iron skillet with Crisco
  • Put the biscuits into the pan–squeezing them together if necessary.
  • Bake for 20-21 minutes.  Ovens may vary.

I found this batch to be fantastic.  Give it a try.  The key to making great biscuits is to experiment.  I found that the butter made them moister and the Miracle Whip gave them outstanding flavor.

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